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Opalescence® Boost PF 40%

In-Office Power Bleach

Return Policy All goods returned (unless faulty) in their original sealed packaging and are in a re-saleable condition within 15 days for Gunz and 30 days for Henry Schein will be eligible for refund. Goods purchased from Dentavision shall be returned for credit within 21 days. See full details

Product Details

Opalescence Boost in-office power whitener is a chemically activated gel that provides brighter, whiter teeth after about an hour in the dental chair. The powerful 40% hydrogen peroxide gel is chemically activated, so it doesn’t require a hot, uncomfortable light to work. Using the unique double-syringe configuration, the clinician activates the 40% hydrogen peroxide formula just prior to application, ensuring every dose of Opalescence Boost whitening is fresh and effective.

  • Chemically activated, so no light is needed
  • Powerful 40% hydrogen peroxide gel
  • Opalescence tooth whitening gel contains PF (potassium nitrate and fluoride). Potassium nitrate has been shown to help reduce sensitivity. Fluoride has been shown to help reduce caries and strengthen enamel. Together they help to improve the overall health of the teeth.1,2
  • Fresh chemical for each application
  • Precise delivery
  • Easy to see for complete removal
  • Two to three 20-minute applications
  • Thicker formula prevents the gel from running
  • No refrigeration required prior to mixing

 

Indications for Use

Opalescence Boost

Opalescence Boost is a 40% power whitening gel for medical in-office use only. It is applied by the dentist for whitening one or more teeth, parts of a tooth, and/or for accelerated chairside whitening techniques. Opalescence Boost is also used on nonvital teeth, including in-office intracoronal bleaching.
 
Opalescence Boost is an alternative, conservative method for treating dark, internally discoloured teeth (compared to crowns, veneers, etc.) caused by disease, injury, or medical treatment such as congenital, systemic, metabolic, pharmacological, traumatic, or iatrogenic factors such as dental fluorosis, jaundice, tetracycline, adult minocycline stains, porphyria, trauma, and erythroblastosis fetalis.
 
Opalescence Boost can be used alone or in conjunction with other Opalescence tooth whitening treatments.
 
Because restorative materials will not whiten, we recommend that teeth are whitened prior to placing esthetic restorations. (Wait two weeks after bleaching procedures before placing adhesive restorations.) Our experience shows that most treated teeth continue to whiten 12 to 24 hours after whitening treatment is completed. Bleaching problematic teeth to a more natural shade will optimize restorative shade matching.

Clinicals

Opalescence® Boost PF 40%

  1. Basting RT, Rodrigues AL Jr, Serra MC. The effects of seven carbamide peroxide bleaching agents on enamel microhardness over time. J Am Dent Assoc. 2003;134(10):1335-42.
  2. Al-Qunaian TA. The effect of whitening agents on caries susceptibility of human enamel. Oper Dent. 2005;30(2):265-70.
  3. Buchalla W, Attin T. External bleaching therapy with activation by heat, light or laser—a systematic review. Dent Mater. 2007;23(5):586-96.
  4. Hein DK, Ploeger BJ, Hartup JK, Wagstaff RS, Palmer TM, Hansen LD. In-office vital tooth bleaching—what do lights add? Compend Contin Educ Dent. 2003;24(4A):340-52.
  5. Caviedes-Bucheli J, Ariza-García G, Restrepo-Méndez S, Ríos-Osorio N, Lombana N, Muñoz HR. The effect of tooth bleaching on substance P expression in human dental pulp. J Endod. 2008;34(12):1462-5.
  6. Kugel G, Papathanasiou A, Williams AJ 3rd, Anderson C, Ferreira S. Clinical evaluation of chemical and light-activated tooth whitening systems. Compend Contin Educ. 2006;27(1)54-62.
  7. Bruzell EM, Johnsen B, Aalerud TN, Dahl JE, Christensen T. Photochem. In vitro efficacy and risk for adverse effects of light-assisted tooth bleaching. Photochem Photobiol Sci. 2009;8(3):377-85.
  8. Haywood, V. New bleaching considerations compared with at-home bleaching. J Esthet Restor Dent. 2003;15(3):184-7.
  9. Jones AH, Diaz-Arnold AM, Vargas MA, Cobb DS. Colorimetric assessment of laser and home bleaching techniques. J Esthet Dent. 1999;11(2):87-94.
  10. Shelf life is dependent on how product is stored.
  11. Data on file.
  12. Haywood VB. History, safety and effectiveness of current bleaching techniques and applications of the nightguard vital bleaching technique. Quintessence Int. 1992;23(7): 471-488.
  13. Jadad E, Montoya J, Arana G, Gordillo LA, Palo RM, Loguercio AD. Spectrophotometric evaluation of color alterations with a new dental bleaching product in patients wearing orthodontic appliances. Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2011;140(1):e43-7.
  14. Klukowska M, White DJ, Kozak KM, Zoladz JR, Baker RA, Garcia-Godoy F, et al. Effect of bleach on microleakage of Class V composite restorations. J Dent Res. 85(Spec Iss B):0035, 2006 (www.dentalresearch.org).
  15. Angerame D, Garaffa S, Maglione M, Di Lenarda R, De Stefano Dorigo E. Effect of in-office bleaching on Class V composite restorations seal. J Dent Res. 84(Spec Iss A):3013, 2005 (www.dentalresearch.org).
  16. Wilson D, Xu C, Hong L, Wang Y. Effects of clinical factors during tooth whitening on enamel. J Dent Res. 86(Spec Iss A):2632, 2007 (www.dentalresearch.org).
  17. Lim B-S, Ryu I, Lee Y-K, Rhee S-H, Yang H-C, Ahn S-J et al. Effect of bleaching agent on shear bond strength to dentin. J Dent Res. 85(Spec Iss B):0036, 2006 (www.dentalresearch.org).
  18. Haywood VB. A comparison of at-home and in-office bleaching. Dentistry Today. 2000; 19(4):44-53.